How Youtube And Music Companies Reach Generation C

The Music Of A Hardware Startup

In his efforts, Butera, who is the youngest member of his team, was helped by Nashville-based veterans from the recording and music industries. We could have released a workable product one-and-a-half-years ago, says Butera, who admits that notoriously perfectionist companies, such as Apple Apple and Bang and Olufsen are his inspirations. The original prototype for the instrument had twelve buttons and featured components, such as Arduino, that are standard to several hardware startup products. However, Butera says the resulting prototype was limited in variety and scale. They were nice for Western music scales but they were simply switches, he says. In other words, their resulting notes were binary, which toggled between on/off switches. It was bit like a piano that can only be played at a single volume, says Butera. To overcome these limitations, Butera introduced pressure sensitivity and a raft of other features, such as velocity and sensitivity in chords. These features enable tuning of the instrument in multiple modes. Thus, you can play in tune, out of tune, turn the frets on or off or play them at different volumes. This also means that you can play the instrument in multiple modes including guitar, violin, mandolin, and harp. The instruments appearance reflects this eclectic mix. Featuring a slot for the iPhone, the INSTRUMENT 1 looks like a cross between a banjo and a violin and has a built-in plectrum. In addition to diversifying musical range, Butera has also simplified the instruments ergonomics.

If the song is a hit, some portion of the viewers will spring for a download from iTunes , Amazon.com or a similar service. And even if they don’t buy the song, YouTube and the record company share in the revenue from ads that accompany the video. The idea for the collaboration was hatched at a dinner last March attended by executives of Warner Music and YouTube, a unit of Google Inc., who were attending the South by Southwest music and media conference in Austin, Texas. Warner Music executives were looking for ways to reach consumers known as Generation C a term Google uses to describe people ages 18 to 34 who watch online video, visit social networks and blogs and use tablets and smartphones. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll “We were trying to figure out this new concept of how to reach Generation C, how we connect with fans on a much deeper level,” said Jeremy M. Holley, Warner Music Nashville’s senior vice president of consumer marketing. Working in partnership with YouTube, Warner Music embarked on a rare musical joint venture between its recording artists and the musicians who have cultivated their fan bases on the site. Warner contacted seven YouTube creators whose musical styles were compatible with those of Warner Music Nashville/Atlantic Records singer-songwriter Hayes and Atlantic Records artist Mraz. It invited Tyler Ward, Kina Grannis, Peter Hollens and other YouTube notables to record cover versions of “Everybody’s Got Somebody but Me,” which were incorporated into the original song to produce a new track. The resulting musical collaboration served as the sound track for a music video, “The Hunter Hayes YouTube Orchestra featuring Jason Mraz,” which debuts exclusively on YouTube, before the anticipated release of the official music video this month. “When it makes sense and when there’s a natural connection, we try to bring these collaborations together,” said Ali Rivera, YouTube’s West Coast head of artist label relations. “This is the first time we’ve created an entire music video, using more established musicians and the YouTube creators.” PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments Warner even relocated the official music video shoot to Los Angeles from Nashville so Hayes and Mraz could accommodate the project, which is directed by filmmaker and YouTube music producer Kurt Hugo Schneider. Warner Music executives hope the musical mash-up, together with individual music videos that have already been released by the YouTube collaborators, will introduce the song to a generation of fans who rely on YouTube personalities as tastemakers.

Music Review: The Avett Brothers deliver fine folk on ‘Magpie and the Dandelion’

A worker cleans an exterior of a newly built urban complex building accommodating offices and retail shops in Beijing October 14, 2013.  REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

By Associated Press, Magpie and the Dandelion, The Avett Brothers (American) The evolving definition of folk music currently carries a little bit of rock, a little bit of reverb and a few other nontraditional flavors thrown in the stew. Its all being well received and The Avett Brothers new album Magpie and the Dandelion should be no exception. Looking for things to do? Select one or more criteria to search Kid-friendly Get ideas Songs like Open Ended Life and Skin and Bones present a folk version of rocks wall-of-sound approach. Instead of a nuanced give and take between banjo and guitar and drums, we get them all at once, side by side, vying for attention. With proper mixing it works on these hardened-heart love songs. Things work up to a glorious crescendo on several tracks, going from simmer to boil on Another is Waiting. Though its worth noting that the sizzle on Magpie is mostly thanks to strong instrumentals. The group lacks a strong lead vocalist. Both Scott and Seth Avett can sing, but not convincingly enough to mesmerize the listener because of it. All in all, this is pleasant listening and the songs stick in the head. The North Carolina trio is a tight band eight albums into their career, and the folk renaissance has ushered in a new and deserving appreciation for their lilting nu-folk. ___ Follow Ron Harris: http://www.twitter.com/Journorati Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

Music Review: Timeless doom and gloom from Linda Thompson on latest, and it sounds lovely

A worker cleans an exterior of a newly built urban complex building accommodating offices and retail shops in Beijing October 14, 2013.  REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

By Associated Press, Linda Thompson, Wont Be Long Now (Pettifer Sounds) Linda Thompson briefly plays the role of proud parent on her new album, happily slipping into the background while her children sing Anna McGarrigles As Fast As My Feet. Looking for things to do? Select one or more criteria to search Kid-friendly Get ideas Its a rousing rendition and a rare moment of peppy pop on Wont Be Long Now. With Thompson front and center, doom and gloom dominates the rest of the record no surprise to longtime fans of Thompson and her ex-husband, Richard. She sings of war, fear, domestic abuse, loneliness and death, and like the gray sky on the cover, theres a bleak beauty to the music. Thompsons bracing, unvarnished alto remains a wonder despite her history of career-curtailing voice trouble. She chooses her material wisely, mixing traditional British and Irish folk with songs she wrote that have the same timeless feel. The family provides plenty of help. Daughter Kami takes the lead on As Fast As My Feet, and son Teddy contributes as a composer on four songs, including the wry title cut. Even Richard lends a hand, with his acoustic guitar the only backing instrument on the lovely opener Loves for Babies and Fools. It sounds like something they might have performed together 40 years ago again, timeless. Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.